Tag: Router

22
May
2017

macOS Wi-FI Tip

Did you know that you can quickly access information about your Router, and check if your Wi-Fi Network is performing well? See your BSSID, signal-to-noise ratio, and even the transmit rate between your Router and Computer. All it takes is a press of a button and a click of your trackpad/mouse.

If you hold down the Option (alt) key and click the Wi-Fi icon in the menu bar, it will provide you with details about your Router and the Network you’re using. The items in gray (except for “Wi-Fi: On”) are all pieces of additional information seen only in this mode.

IP Address: This is your computer’s IP address.

Router: Your router’s IP address. You can type this into your browser to access your router’s web interface.

Internet: This tells you if you are able to access the internet or not. If not, open Wireless Diagnostics.

Security: Your router’s security. Most Routers on the market offer WPA2 Personal, and it keeps your network encrypted.

BSSID: This is your Router’s MAC, or hardware address. It acts as an identifier for your Router that lets it talk to other network-connected devices.

Channel: This is your WLAN channel, and it determines which radio frequency the router uses to transmit information.

RSSI: Received Signal Strength Indicator measures how well a device “hears” a signal from the router. It’s useful for determining if you have enough signal to get a good wireless connection.

Noise: This measures how much radio noise is interfering with the RSSI signal. Signal-to-noise ratio is a measure used in science and engineering that compares the level of a desired signal to the level of background noise. It is defined as the ratio of signal power to the noise power, often expressed in decibels.

TX Rate: The transmit rate is the speed of the data that is transmitted between your Router and your Computer. Right now I have a speed of 450 Mbps.

PHY Mode: This is the wireless protocol that the Router uses, according to the IEEE 802.11 wireless standard.

MCS Index: This number corresponds to the protocols uses to encode the radio signal.

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